Indian Journal of Sleep Medicine

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VOLUME 1 , ISSUE 4 ( October-December, 2006 ) > List of Articles

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Acceptance and Compliance issues of nasal CPAP amongst Indian patients of obstructive sleep apnea

M.K. Sen, J. C. Suri, U.C. Ojha

Keywords : acceptance, adherence, compliance, obstructive sleep apnea,nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy

Citation Information : Sen M, Suri JC, Ojha U. Acceptance and Compliance issues of nasal CPAP amongst Indian patients of obstructive sleep apnea. Indian Sleep Med 2006; 1 (4):197-203.

DOI: 10.5005/ijsm-1-4-197

License: CC BY-SA 4.0

Published Online: 00-00-0000

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2006; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Three hundred patients of obstructive sleep apnea were selected for this study. Subjective (questionnaire-based) and objective (usage-profile report based) assessments of usage of nasal CPAP in this population were carried out. Several factors responsible for non acceptance and poor compliance were identified, which included causes related to social, economic, cultural and geographical parameters peculiar to our country. In conclusion, some remedial measures are suggested.


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